Get involved

 

Thank you for your interest in the College’s Anniversary, when the RCoA will celebrate 25 years since gaining its Royal Charter. If you have an enquiry or would like to become involved in the activities that are being run please complete this form.

Inspiring the future 

Inspiring the Future – in partnership with the Royal College of Anaesthetists

Inspiring the Future is a free service that connects 7,400 teachers from 4,400 state schools and colleges with over 18,000 volunteers who have pledged to give just one hour per year to speak to young people about their job, career and the education route they took.  Volunteers and schools are connected securely online, with volunteers receiving invites from local schools and colleges to see if they can attend events during the academic year. 

The Inspiring the Future: Inspiring Women campaign aims to sign up through Inspiring the Future 15,000 inspirational women. 

Signing up to Inspiring the Future as a Royal College of Anaesthetists

To sign up to Inspiring the Future simply click the following link and follow the steps.  When completing your profile, in the ‘My Personal Details’section, under the heading ‘My memberships of Professional Association …’ please write Royal College of Anaesthetists and it will appear for you to select.

For more information go to: www.inspiringthefuture.org or download the Inspiring the Future further information document.

The College can provide you with resources to support your talk.  Contact Nicola Wood for further information via rcoa25@rcoa.ac.uk.

Why visit schools?

Dr Anna-Maria Rollin MBE is often asked to visit schools to talk about her career in anaesthesia.  Read her reasons for giving up her time below:

"I visit schools because the pupils are a wonderful audience. No doubt they feel that it’s a bit of a break from ‘real’ work, but they are lively, attentive, ready to laugh (usually in the right places), be a bit shocked by the gory bits, and ask very sharp and pertinent questions. There is often a spontaneous discussion about the ethical/religious  basis for  anaesthesia afterwards, which always astonishes me by its range. Although I expect it, I have never seen the ‘Kevin – sullen, bored teenager’ reaction. If I can do anything to persuade kids like that to go into medicine, and ultimately into anaesthesia, I reckon it’s a couple of hours very well spent. And I enjoy it."